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Prepping Your Cat for Spring Time

Spring is here! With the change of season, we love to think about gardening, spring-cleaning and other home projects. As you tackle your to-do-list, make sure your cat is prepped for the upcoming changes. 

Easter Grass. Spring brings Easter baskets filled with eggs, chocolate and fake grass. Did you know that those plastic green strings can cause gastrointestinal obstructions for pets? Cats love to play with these and can swallow the strands. Make sure to be keep these away from your feline friend.

Plants and Flowers. Speaking of Easter, a favorite indoor plant is the Easter Lily. Although a very beautiful sight, this plant and related lilies along with daffodils and tulips are very toxic to cats. They can cause vomiting and your cat can become very lethargic. If possible, keep this plant out of the house. 

Natural Spring Cleaning. It’s that time of the year to put away the winter gear and get ready for summer. That means we are probably doing a lot of cleaning. If that’s the case, make sure not to use harsh chemicals. Many cleaning solutions are harmful to all animals. Try using a pet-safe alternative that doesn’t contain bleach, ammonia, formaldehyde, isopropyl alcohol or any other harmful chemical. Instead look for products that are eco-friendly and made with biodegradable ingredients.

Grooming Your Cat. Warm weather means a lot of shedding for your cat so make sure to brush your cat because it removes dirt, grease and dead hair. Brushing her once or twice times a week along with feeding her holistic cat food can give her skin and coat a healthy glow. 

Spay and Neuter. Spring is kitten season. While kittens are absolutely adorable, many end up at shelters and rescues. Resources like food, money and space are already hard and the chances of an adult cat being adopted diminishes as they are generally overlooked by potential adopters when there are cute kittens all over the place. How can you help? Spay and neuter your cat. It can save a life of a shelter pet.   

13 thoughts on “Prepping Your Cat for Spring Time”

  1. Older adults should consider adopting an older pet. They deserve love and care, just like us, during the years they have left. When you go into a shelter the older animals just lay there having given up that any one will give them a forever home

    • I love older cats. Vets best guess for my oldest is between 16 & 20 and my youngest is 9 or 10. Kittens are cute but I love my old cats.

  2. There are many advantages to having an older pet. My most recent guy was 4. Sure kittens are cute, but can be very destructive. It’s a good feeling to help out an older pet.

  3. Louise and Patricia, I heartily second your senior-loving sentiments! Shelters are full of beautiful adult cats (and dogs!) needing homes. If you want a high-spirited kitty, or a mellow sun-patch-sleeper, or anything in-between, you can find your perfect companion. And these older animals come all ready to be perfect house-mates, unlike cute little kittens!

  4. I leave out my excess dog and cat hair outside in my yard, as i watch the wild birds snatch up the soft hair/fur to use in their bird’s nest etc.

    • Last Spring I collected the hair from my dog’s brush for weeks; I then put it outside invitingly where the birds come to feed each day….but no takers! My dog and I were both bummed and I think he(my dog) was even a little offended.

  5. I agree with the both of you but I would also consider adopting a super senior cat – 10 years and older. My boy was 19 when he passed but still had the kitten playfulness in him.

  6. We rescued/took in four abandoned cats – 18 YO, 14 YO, 15 YO, and 11 YO (different times).
    They all turned out to be so good, and so much fun. And very, very affectionate.
    And, I swear, they KNEW they were given a second chance, and a loving home.
    They’ve all gone ahead, over The Bridge, and I still miss every single one </3

  7. My kitty was 16 and she was as playful as a kitten as well until the end she loved spaghetti sauce and loved cookie crumbs and was never to the vet until the end.

  8. Rescued a senior cat about a year ago. She was (and still is) skinny. Her front toes had been cut off (“declawed”), she has kidney disease, was dehydrated and despondent. She was thrown out because one of the dogs did not like her. Fortunate for them, these evil people moved before I could go have a word with them! Chita (don’t know her prior name) now eats constantly. She has found her place with the 4 cats already here (ages 7 – 11). She is thriving: loves to lap sit, plays, talks, and watches over me as I sleep. Senior cats are wonderful!

  9. I don’t see anything about what to do with cat hair. It makes excellent nesting material for birds, it dries quickly and is insulating; just perfect for tiny birds who need warmth. Put it in a suet cage which is easily found anywhere that carries wild bird supplies and some grocery stores that carry wild bird seed. You don’t need a large one so they are usually under $5

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