Category: Pet Obesity

Achieving Your Pet’s Summer Body Goals

A number of my clients have seen their dog’s bodies change as a result of COVID lockdowns. Some have had extra time to walk their dogs and their dogs have trimmed up– great! But for many, there has been extra time at home which has only encouraged pet owners to dole out too many treats. Even before the pandemic, pet obesity was considered an epidemic, with over half (!!) of the dogs in the USA overweight as of 2018. Here are a few tips and tricks to help your pet stay in a healthy body condition this summer.

Pet Fitness During Quarantine:

While we quarantine , your pet isn’t able to enjoy the dog park or long walks like they used to but it is important your pet maintains a healthy weight. According to a recent study by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), 55.8 percent of dogs and 59.5 percent of cats are overweight or obese. Roughly 80 million U.S. dogs and cats share an increased risk for weight-related disorders such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, hypertension and many cancers.

WORKING OVERTIME TO HELP OVERWEIGHT PETS

Pet Product News recently reported on the current trend in our country of overweight pets. They mention Halo natural pet food in the article: “Though not labeled as being for weight loss, many of Tampa, Fla.-based Halo, Purely for Pets’ natural pet food offerings meet the Association of American Feed Control Officials’ “light” criteria.” Thank

TRACIE HOTCHNER: XENA THE (HALO HEALTHY WEIGHT CHALLENGE) SUPERSTAR!

When we welcomed a darling little Pomeranian named Xena into our challenge she was not an obese doggy – just a chubby one. Luckily, her people John and Pam knew that they had let her tip the scales in the wrong direction with too many treats but they had not been able to figure out

TRACIE HOTCHNER: CANINE “SURVIVAL” TIPS FOR (VERY) COLD WINTER WEATHER

We’ve been having some bitter cold days recently in parts of the country and there are a number of things you can do to keep your dog comfortable – and safe – outdoors. Do not assume they have the “common sense” to come indoors when they begin to get hypothermia or frostbite on their ears